ARTICLES
Folate Intake Increases Outcomes for Assisted Reproductive Technology
For women undergoing assisted reproductive technology treatment, higher supplemental folate intake is associated with improved outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.
FDA Approves Movantik for the Treatment of Opioid-induced Constipation
Movantik (naloxegol), an oral peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist, has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation in adults with chronic non-cancer pain.
Male Pattern Baldness Tied to Prostate Cancer
Men with male pattern baldness may face a higher risk of developing an aggressive type of prostate cancer than men with no balding, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
Chest Radiation May Help Fight Some Advanced Lung Cancers
Adding chest radiation to chemotherapy allows some people with small-cell lung cancer to live longer and cuts recurrence rates by nearly 50%, European researchers report. The research was published online Sept. 14 in The Lancet to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, held from Sept. 14 to 18 in San Francisco.
Neuroprotective Compound Saves Blasted Brain Cells
A compound known as P7C3-S243 appears to keep axons from degenerating after a blast injury, a University of Iowa mouse study has found. “We propose that P7C3-S243 serves as a chemical scaffold upon which new drugs can be designed to treat patients with condition of axonal degradation such as occurs in traumatic brain injury or other neurodegenerative disease,” the researchers wrote
Genetically, Schizophrenia Has Eight Forms
Researchers have long known that the risk for schizophrenia is inherited. In new findings published online Sept 15 in The American Journal of Psychiatry, senior investigator C. Robert Cloninger, MD, PhD, of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, said his team identified distinct gene clusters that contribute to 8 different classes of the disease.
Exercise, not Drugs for ‘Gotta Go’ Problems
A new set of guidelines from the American College of Physicians (ACP) advises physicians to prescribe exercises and behavioral therapy—not drugs—as first-line treatment for many patients with urinary incontinence (UI).