ARTICLES
Ebola Doc Hospitalized in NYC
In what could be New York City’s first case of Ebola, a doctor identified by the NY Post as Craig Spencer, 33, MD an emergency medicine physician at New York Hospital/Columbia-Presbyterian was rushed to a special Ebola unit at city-run Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan. Spencer returned 10 days ago from a stint as a volunteer with Doctors without Borders, caring for Ebola victims in Guinea, one of three West African nations with major outbreaks.
Smartphone App Could Double as Ophthalmology Tool
Patients diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy may be able to get a sense of how their condition has progressed without having to leave the comfort of their own home.
FOLFOXIRI + Bevacizumab Ups Outcome in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
For patients with untreated metastatic colorectal cancer, chemotherapy with fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan plus bevacizumab improves outcome versus fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan plus bevacizumab, according to a study published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Mortality Declines for Aortic Dissection Patients
Over the last decade, mortality rates for patients undergoing surgical repair for aortic dissection have improved, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.
For Pulmonary Hypertension Sufferers, Plant Leaves Could be Key to Relief
A collaborative effort from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and University of Florida has yielded plant leaves as a viable treatment for pulmonary hypertension.
For Latinos, Ancestry Drives Asthma Development
Among Latinos, a Native American heritage was linked to a lower rate of asthma development, while an African lineage resulted in an increased asthma risk, researchers at University of California San Francisco found.
Researchers Pinpoint Novel Asthma Treatment Target
By comparing healthy and asthmatic lung cells post-infection, Imperial College London researchers believe they have discovered a new treatment target for asthma.
Prenatal Exposure to Common Chemical Linked to Childhood Asthma
Prenatal exposure to phthalates, a chemical commonly used in cosmetics, increases children’s asthma risk, according to study results published in Environmental Health Perspectives.
Americans Report Distrust of Medical Profession
Americans are less trusting of the medical profession than people in many other countries -- even though they often like their own doctor, according to a new report. The findings were published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Recalled Supplements Linger on US Store Shelves
Two-thirds of dietary supplements recalled by the US Food and Drug Administration because they contained banned ingredients remained on store shelves at least six months after they were recalled, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.