AAAAI2014
Visit this page for The American Journal of Managed Care's exclusive conference coverage of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology's 2014 meeting in San Diego, California, from February 28 to March 4. We'll be there with thousands of allergists, immunologists, and allied health professionals to hear the most up-to-date scientific findings on allergic diseases, asthma, food allergies, skin rashes and diseases, the latest in immunotherapy and how the arrival of health care form will affect everything. You can receive our daily email blasts by registering here, and please check back daily during the conference to learn what's happening.
Day 1
Out With the Stethoscope, In With the Smartphone: How Genomics and Digital Advances Will Reshape Practice
The introduction for Eric J. Topol, MD, who gave the keynote address Saturday at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) in San Diego, California, ended with the usual instruction: Please silence your cell phone.
From Cost-Benefit Concerns to Personalized Medicine: What's New in Treating the Youngest Patients
Some of the same themes being raised across medicine-how to balance the quality of care with soaring therapy costs, and how to unleash the power of genomics to tailor treatment-were part of Saturday's workshop Hot Topics in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. The session of the American Academy of Pediatrics took place during the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology in San Diego, California.
Studies Evaluate Use of Adherence Estimator in Asthma Treatment
Asthma is among the diseases for which adherence presents challenges, both to physicians and to manufacturers of therapies. Two studies presented Saturday at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology in San Diego, California, discuss an attempt by one manufacturer, Merck, to overcome the problem through the development of an adherence estimator called AE.
Day 2
Dosing, Duration of Therapy Examined In Peanut Allergy Studies
Researchers seeking to reduce the dangers of peanut allergies have seen encouraging results in recent years from oral immunotherapy. But many questions remain: How large of a dose? For how long? And, once treatment ends, does its effectiveness last, or does it eventually wear off?
Results Presented for 2 Allergic Rhinitis Immunotherapy Treatments Awaiting FDA Action
Two oral immunotherapy treatments for allergic rhinitis being developed by Merck and ALK-Abello, which received separate approvals in recent months from the Allergenic Products Advisory Panel (APAC) of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA),1,2 are the subject of results presented Monday at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology in San Diego, California.
Challenges of Adherence to Asthma Medications Explored
Taking care of asthma patients costs the nation $56 billion a year, and included in that total are the costs of the many sufferers who do not properly follow their prescriptions.
Day 3
AAAAI Issues New Round of 'Don'ts Designed to Improve Patient Care
The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) on Monday released its second list of overused tests and procedures that allergists, primary care physicians, and patients should question before they occur. The list represents the fruits of the Academy's second year of participation in the Choosing Wisely initiative, and was presented at a press conference during the Academy's meeting in San Diego, California.
The Tale of Oral Immunotherapy for Allergy Rhinitis: Europe Has Approvals, US Has the Ragweed
A sunrise session on climate change, followed by Tuesday's poster session on allergen immunotherapy at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) in San Diego, California, highlighted the irony: Thanks in no small part to the cost of navigating the approval process of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Europe has more options to treat seasonal allergies, even though America has far more ragweed.
Biology's Big Solutions Will Start by Thinking Small
Did you think biology only involved studying people, animals, and plants? How about tumors, or maybe cells? Keep going. Smaller. A lot smaller.