500,000 Women to be Offered Breast Cancer Drugs

Published Online: January 16, 2013
Those most at risk should be eligible for preventative treatment to reduce the chances of it developing, NHS told. More than half a million women at risk of breast cancer should be offered drugs by the NHS for the first time to stop it developing, according to official health advice that could lead to a historic shift from treatment of the country's most common cancer to its prevention.

All women over 30 in England and Wales judged to be at moderate or high risk of breast cancer would be able to take one of two drugs to reduce their risk under the draft guideline drawn up by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice).

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/Xzoldn

Source: Oncology Business Review

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