5.2 Million Adults Will Fall Into ACA Coverage Gap Next Year

About 5.2 million poor, uninsured adults will fall into the coverage gap, created by 26 states choosing not to expand Medicaid under the federal health law next year, according to a study released today by the Kaiser Family Foundation.
Published Online: October 25, 2013
About 5.2 million poor, uninsured adults will fall into the “coverage gap,” created by 26 states choosing not to expand Medicaid under the federal health law next year, according to a study released today by the Kaiser Family Foundation. (KHN is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)

These people are projected to have incomes too high to qualify for their state’s existing Medicaid programs, but below the federal poverty level (nearly $11,500 for an individual) required to be eligible for federal subsidies to buy private coverage on the new online insurance marketplaces set up by the Affordable Care Act. Medicaid is the state-federal health insurance program for the poor.

“Millions of adults will remain outside the reach of the ACA and continue to have limited, if any, options for health coverage,” the study concludes.

The law provides full federal funding for three years to states that expand Medicaid to cover residents under 138 percent of the poverty level (or just under $15,900 for an individual). But the Supreme Court made that requirement effectively optional for states, and most Republican led-states have opted against expanding the program.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1eqUhJT

Source: Kaiser Health News



Feature
Recommended Articles
California’s recent initiatives to address the impact of high priced hepatitis C drugs could not have come at a better time, as a new analysis estimates that the state’s projected specialty drug expenditure would be $4.77 billion in the next year alone.
Aetna's purchase of Humana would create a managed care company with $115 billion in revenues, of which 56% would be from government business. In addition, the combined company would have the largest enrollment of members on public exchanges, with 1.7 million members.
Newly insured consumers under the Affordable Care Act have turned out to be sicker than initially estimated, according to health insurance companies, who are seeking rate increases of at least 20% to 40%, reported the New York Times.
Although nearly equal amounts of people view the Affordable Care Act favorably (43%) as unfavorably (40%), a majority of Americans say they approved of the Supreme Court's decision to continue to allow Americans living in states on the federally facilitated exchange to be eligible for insurance subsidies, according to a recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation.
This week GOP presidential candidate hopefuls turned their attention to the 2016 election as the next best chance to repeal Obamacare, and CMS released data revealing $6.5 billion payments to healthcare providers from drug and medical device makers in 2014.