5.2 Million Adults Will Fall Into ACA Coverage Gap Next Year

About 5.2 million poor, uninsured adults will fall into the coverage gap, created by 26 states choosing not to expand Medicaid under the federal health law next year, according to a study released today by the Kaiser Family Foundation.
Published Online: October 25, 2013
About 5.2 million poor, uninsured adults will fall into the “coverage gap,” created by 26 states choosing not to expand Medicaid under the federal health law next year, according to a study released today by the Kaiser Family Foundation. (KHN is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)

These people are projected to have incomes too high to qualify for their state’s existing Medicaid programs, but below the federal poverty level (nearly $11,500 for an individual) required to be eligible for federal subsidies to buy private coverage on the new online insurance marketplaces set up by the Affordable Care Act. Medicaid is the state-federal health insurance program for the poor.

“Millions of adults will remain outside the reach of the ACA and continue to have limited, if any, options for health coverage,” the study concludes.

The law provides full federal funding for three years to states that expand Medicaid to cover residents under 138 percent of the poverty level (or just under $15,900 for an individual). But the Supreme Court made that requirement effectively optional for states, and most Republican led-states have opted against expanding the program.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1eqUhJT

Source: Kaiser Health News



Feature
Recommended Articles
Legislative action on Medicare’s Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) could have important implications for physicians, especially in terms of financial risk. In the 13th part of the Healthcare Reform Stakeholder Summit, panelists Francois de Brantes, MS, MBA, Ateev Mehrotra, MD, MPH, and Arthur Vercillo, MD, FACS, delved into the topic of SGR reform.
Officials say the number of enrollees and their relative good health made it possible to negotiate lower rate increases. However, premium increases are higher in Northern California, where there is less competition.
Commercial health plans will soon face a new Federal rule that will require them to provide counseling to obese and some overweight beneficiaries—and most will need help complying. Omada Health co-founder and CEO Sean Duffy, writing this month in Evidence-Based Diabetes Management, tells how the CDC has opened the door for digital health programs to offer a scalable, effective solution.
Many things that need to be refined in order to build successful learning health systems, including an infrastructure that supports learning and research and a better exchange of data and computer information.
Although hospital readmissions can be difficult to predict, there is a link between the number of discharge medications prescribed to a patient and the risk of 30-day readmission.