A New Healthcare Workforce

Matching labor supply with service demand is a challenge for many US industries, but perhaps no industry faces greater workforce pressures than healthcare.
Published Online: October 30, 2013
Matching labor supply with service demand is a challenge for many US industries, but perhaps no industry faces greater workforce pressures than health care. In the new era of system reform, with 32 million more newly insured Americans seeking health care coverage in 2014, resources will be stretched and staffing needs – from clinicians to home health aides, information technology specialists to billers and coders – are expected to grow exponentially.

Innovations are being tested to create the workforce of the future that can meet accelerated demand for care and support new value-based delivery models. We look here at four key initiatives.

Read the full story here: http://onforb.es/1f02qoZ

Source: Forbes

Feature
Recommended Articles
The study found that the geriatric population in the United States receives prescriptions for mental health drugs at more than twice the rate that younger adults do, but they present a lower rate of seeking psychiatric care.
Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr (D-NJ), explains the purpose of the National Institutes of Health Innovation Fund, which allows the organization to find cures for diseases that don’t have 1 yet.
A study published in JAMA Oncology presents a new tool that can predict disease recurrence in oropharyngeal cancer patients.
Proposed mergers of Aetna and Humana, and Anthem and Cigna, raise questions of whether consumers will continue to see competition in health insurance markets.
Clinical pathways (CPs) are increasingly being utilized to improve quality of care and control healthcare costs in the United States. A new report from Avalere Health examines the development of CPs, use of evidence to inform their design, implementation processes, and their impact on quality of care, costs, and outcomes.