A New Healthcare Workforce

Matching labor supply with service demand is a challenge for many US industries, but perhaps no industry faces greater workforce pressures than healthcare.
Published Online: October 30, 2013
Matching labor supply with service demand is a challenge for many US industries, but perhaps no industry faces greater workforce pressures than health care. In the new era of system reform, with 32 million more newly insured Americans seeking health care coverage in 2014, resources will be stretched and staffing needs – from clinicians to home health aides, information technology specialists to billers and coders – are expected to grow exponentially.

Innovations are being tested to create the workforce of the future that can meet accelerated demand for care and support new value-based delivery models. We look here at four key initiatives.

Read the full story here: http://onforb.es/1f02qoZ

Source: Forbes

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