Administration Unveils Health Care Regulations

Published Online: November 21, 2012
Starting in January, insurers will be unable to charge consumers more based on such factors as health status and occupation -- but smoking may cost you.

WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration released new health care regulations Tuesday that preclude insurers from adjusting premiums based on pre-existing or chronic health conditions, tell states what benefits must be included in health exchange plans, and allow employers to reward employees who work to remain healthy.

"The Affordable Care Act is building a health insurance market that works for consumers," said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. "Thanks to the health care law, no one will be discriminated against because of a pre-existing condition."

Read the full story: http://usat.ly/ScDLSQ

Source: USA Today

Feature
Recommended Articles
The announced price for alirocumab, the first PCSK9 inhibitor approved for use in the US, was the top story in managed care this week. Also, HHS announced $100 million available to combat substance abuse, and Medicare and Medicaid turn 50 years old.
Proposed mergers of Aetna and Humana, and Anthem and Cigna, raise questions of whether consumers will continue to see competition in health insurance markets.
Fifty years ago today, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the law that created Medicare and Medicaid, setting in motion not only the greatest change in healthcare in the nation's history at that point, but also a lasting change for society.
Increasing health insurance enrollment is only one part of the goal of the Affordable Care Act—the law also aims to improve population health and lower healthcare costs, but less attention has been paid to these critical steps.
Officials say the number of enrollees and their relative good health made it possible to negotiate lower rate increases. However, premium increases are higher in Northern California, where there is less competition.