Administration Unveils Health Care Regulations

Published Online: November 21, 2012
Starting in January, insurers will be unable to charge consumers more based on such factors as health status and occupation -- but smoking may cost you.

WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration released new health care regulations Tuesday that preclude insurers from adjusting premiums based on pre-existing or chronic health conditions, tell states what benefits must be included in health exchange plans, and allow employers to reward employees who work to remain healthy.

"The Affordable Care Act is building a health insurance market that works for consumers," said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. "Thanks to the health care law, no one will be discriminated against because of a pre-existing condition."

Read the full story: http://usat.ly/ScDLSQ

Source: USA Today

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