CMS Issues 2015 Proposed IPPS Rule

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services late Wednesday issued a proposed rule for 2015 that reduces payment for readmissions and hospital-acquired conditions, but provides no changes to the controversial two-midnight rule.
Published Online: May 01, 2014

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services late Wednesday issued a proposed rule for 2015 that reduces payment for readmissions and hospital-acquired conditions, but provides no changes to the controversial two-midnight rule.

The agency proposes to increase the payment rate for inpatient stays at general acute care hospitals by 1.3 percent in fiscal year 2015, but only 0.8 percent for long-term care hospitals.

CMS Administrator Marilyn Tavenner said in an announcement that the aim of the proposed rule is to improve hospital performance while "creating an environment for improved Medicare beneficiary care and satisfaction."

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1fSXd1t

Source: Fierce Healthcare


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