Can the IRS Handle Obamacare?

Published Online: November 20, 2012
Now that the health care law’s future is finally secure, it’s up to the Internal Revenue Service to make sure the money flows.

But only the right amount of money. And only to the people who are supposed to get it. The agency is charged with shouldering some of the law’s most nitty-gritty technical details, from making sure Americans receive the insurance premium tax credits they’re eligible for, to incorporating more than 40 changes to the Tax Code, to collecting penalties from individuals and businesses that fail to meet the law’s insurance requirements.

Read the full story: http://politi.co/USL72w

Source: Politico

Feature
Recommended Articles
Increasing health insurance enrollment is only one part of the goal of the Affordable Care Act—the law also aims to improve population health and lower healthcare costs, but less attention has been paid to these critical steps.
Officials say the number of enrollees and their relative good health made it possible to negotiate lower rate increases. However, premium increases are higher in Northern California, where there is less competition.
Commercial health plans will soon face a new Federal rule that will require them to provide counseling to obese and some overweight beneficiaries—and most will need help complying. Omada Health co-founder and CEO Sean Duffy, writing this month in Evidence-Based Diabetes Management, tells how the CDC has opened the door for digital health programs to offer a scalable, effective solution.
Before “value” became a cancer care buzzword, The American Journal of Managed Care was the first to create a conference where stakeholders discussed how to deliver the best care possible—and figure out how to pay for it. The fourth installment of Patient-Centered Oncology Care on November 19-20, 2015, in Baltimore, Maryland, will address the regulation of molecular diagnostics and ongoing efforts at payment reform.
What are managed care readers following so far in 2015? At the midway point of celebrating its 20th year of publication, The American Journal of Managed Care lists the most-read articles from its print journals over the first 6 months.