Carl June Receives 2014 Taubman Prize for his Pioneering Work in Adoptive Cell Transfer

A physician-scientist who developed a personalized immunotherapy for leukemia using patients’ own T cells is the recipient of the 2014 Taubman Prize for Excellence in Translational Medical Science, awarded by the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute at the University of Michigan Medical School.
Published Online: June 05, 2014

Carl June, M.D. of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will receive the $100,000 prize in recognition of the treatment he designed that is credited as the first successful and sustained demonstration of the use of gene transfer therapy to turn the body’s own immune cells into weapons aimed at cancerous tumors.

The research is considered a landmark breakthrough in treating blood cancers that have stopped responding to conventional therapies, or for patients who are not candidates for bone marrow transplants, which carry a high mortality risk.

 “Dr. June’s visionary approach has transformed the scientific approach to these cancers and brought hope to patients who had little or none,” said Eva Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Taubman Institute. “We are honored to recognize his extraordinary contributions by awarding him the Taubman Prize.”

Read the story here: http://bit.ly/1jUErr9

Source: Taubman Institute



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