Cigna Plows Ahead with Quality-Based Reimbursement Venture

As part of a contract extension with Tenet Healthcare, Cigna has established a first of its kind quality-based reimbursement agreement.
Published Online: May 21, 2014
As part of a contract extension with Tenet Healthcare, Cigna has established a first of its kind quality-based reimbursement agreement.

The deal extends in-network access for Cigna’s commercial and HealthSpring Medicare Advantage members at Tenet’s 77 hospitals and 190 outpatient centers in 15 states, mostly in the south, southwest and midwest, including Illinois, Texas and Florida.

It also represents Cigna’s first pay-for-quality contract with a health system. The arrangement “rewards Tenet hospitals for improved quality of care and cost efficiency, which, for the first year, will be based on national quality measures established by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services,” the companies said.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1i4SxWZ

Souce: Healthcare Payer News



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