Doc-Led ACOs Show Promise for Patients, Payers

In the search for meaningful patient care improvements and sustainable financing, some independent physician groups are charting unique approaches that may offer models for payers and providers in the age of cost-containment and risk-sharing.
Published Online: June 02, 2014
In the search for meaningful patient care improvements and sustainable financing, some independent physician groups are charting unique approaches that may offer models for payers and providers in the age of cost-containment and risk-sharing.

Created in 1979 amid the rise of HMOs in Southern California, the Heritage Provider Network has evolved into an independent group practice with 2,100 primary care physicians working on a clinical model that tries to make managed care feel less “managed” and bridge gaps between social, personal and health issues before they grow into bigger, costly problems.

As part of a large commercial accountable care contract covering 70,000 lives and three Medicare ACOs, Heritage Provider Network is scaling up services it has been pursuing since before health reform and positioning itself as an payer-agnostic partner for insurers for the post-fee-for-service era.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1nYgbtP

Source: Healthcare Payer News



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