Effort To Curb Medicare Spending Begins With Crackdown On Hospital Readmissions

Published Online: November 27, 2012
After years of gently prodding hospitals to make sure discharged patients do not need to return, the federal government is now using its financial muscle to discourage readmissions.

Medicare last month began levying financial penalties against 2,217 hospitals it says have had too many readmissions. Of those hospitals, 307 will receive the maximum punishment, a 1 percent reduction in Medicare’s regular payments for every patient over the next year, federal records show.

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Source: Kaiser Health News (in collaboration with The New York Times)

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