Focus on Health Insurance Exchange Enrollment Overlooks Millions Who Bought Private Insurance

Want to know how many people have signed up for private insurance under Obamacare? Like the health care law itself, the answer is exceedingly complicated.
Published Online: April 16, 2014

Want to know how many people have signed up for private insurance under Obamacare? Like the health care law itself, the answer is exceedingly complicated.

The Obama administration is tracking the number of plans purchased on the federal website healthcare.gov and on the state marketplaces, and this month reported that IT  had exceeded expectations by signing up 7.5 million people. In addition, federal officials have said that 3 million people have enrolled in Medicaid since October.

But often overlooked is that enrollment in private health plans outside the marketplaces is also booming. The federal government hasn’t been counting the number of people who buy new plans directly from insurance carriers -- and that number could be substantial.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1l7ryfI

Source: MedCity News


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