How is Uneven HIE Adoption Affecting Population Health?

Accountable care organizations (ACOs) and other population health initiatives cannot succeed without health information being able to flow between healthcare organizations and providers.
Published Online: March 11, 2014
Accountable care organizations (ACOs) and other population health initiatives cannot succeed without health information being able to flow between healthcare organizations and providers. For Children’s Medical Center VP and CIO Pamela Arora, health information exchange (HIE) ranks high on her list of priorities for the coming year as her organization attempts to implement a model of accountable care for its pediatric population in Texas.
 
“What we’re finding is in Texas in some cases the organizations we want to have hooked into an HIE aren’t necessarily as compelled to do so,” Arora told EHRIntelligence.com at HIMSS14. “We’re trying to look at new ways to get the value proposition up with, let’s say, a private HIE that meets some of their other needs so that they’ll wish to hook in and be able to let that data flow.”

This work is on top of the other activities that already Arora and her staff busy. As a 2013 HIMSS Davies Award and Stage 7 hospital according to the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model (EMRAM), expectations are already high. New inroads into accountable care and population health raise the stakes.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1elWpB5

Source: EHR Intelligence


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