Insurers Prod Doctors, Hospitals To Stop Elective Early Deliveries

Published Online: January 22, 2013

Jenn McCorkle still regrets giving birth early. McCorkle was 37 weeks pregnant when her obstetrician scheduled her for a Caesarean section the following week, saying there was no reason to wait.
 

But when her son, Maverick, was born in August 2008, his lungs were not fully developed; within hours, one of them collapsed. The infant spent the next 13 days in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), most of them hooked up to a ventilator.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/XTiwaY

Source: Kaiser Health News



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