Is Healthcare Transparency Stuck in the Dark Ages?

As the quality and cost transparency movements gain support within the healthcare industry, a more important question persists: what will actually work for consumers?
Published Online: March 31, 2014
As the quality and cost transparency movements gain support within the healthcare industry, a more important question persists: what will actually work for consumers?

Though some startups targeting cost comparison for employers are enjoying success, few cost and quality transparency technologies are being used by consumers. While over 90 percent of insurers are offering members cost calculators of some kind, only about 2 percent of members are actually using them, according to research by Catalyst for Payment Reform.

That suggests many of the early generation transparency tools are inadequate — perhaps in part because valuation of health services based on quality and cost remains difficult for payers and regulators, let alone paying patients given the information available to them.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/P9724r

Source: Healthcare Payer News



Feature
Recommended Articles
Clinical pathways (CPs) are increasingly being utilized to improve quality of care and control healthcare costs in the United States. A new report from Avalere Health examines the development of CPs, use of evidence to inform their design, implementation processes, and their impact on quality of care, costs, and outcomes.
Healthcare spending growth between 2014 and 2024 is projected to be substantially lower than the 3 decades prior to 2008, according to a new report from CMS. In addition, the average premium for a basic Medicare Part D prescription plan will remain stable in 2016.
Picking the right measurements to assess improvement in medication management depends largely on the what group is being considered, said Woody Eisenberg, MD, senior vice president of performance measurement and strategic alliances for the Pharmacy Quality Alliance.
Urologists at Cancer Research UK have identified 5 distinct genomic signatures in prostate cancer that can have important implications on treatment decisions.
Increasing health insurance enrollment is only one part of the goal of the Affordable Care Act—the law also aims to improve population health and lower healthcare costs, but less attention has been paid to these critical steps.