Is Healthcare Transparency Stuck in the Dark Ages?

As the quality and cost transparency movements gain support within the healthcare industry, a more important question persists: what will actually work for consumers?
Published Online: March 31, 2014
As the quality and cost transparency movements gain support within the healthcare industry, a more important question persists: what will actually work for consumers?

Though some startups targeting cost comparison for employers are enjoying success, few cost and quality transparency technologies are being used by consumers. While over 90 percent of insurers are offering members cost calculators of some kind, only about 2 percent of members are actually using them, according to research by Catalyst for Payment Reform.

That suggests many of the early generation transparency tools are inadequate — perhaps in part because valuation of health services based on quality and cost remains difficult for payers and regulators, let alone paying patients given the information available to them.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/P9724r

Source: Healthcare Payer News



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