Lawmakers Urge CMS to Extend MU Hardship Exception for Pathologists

Eighty-nine members of Congress have asked the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to give pathologists a break and extend the hardship exemption they currently enjoy for all of Stage 3 of the Meaningful Use program.
Published Online: July 18, 2014

Eighty-nine members of Congress have asked the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to give pathologists a break and extend the hardship exemption they currently enjoy for all of Stage 3 of the Meaningful Use program.

In the letter--dated July 10 and addressed to CMS Administrator Marilyn Tavenner--the lawmakers point out that CMS had recognized in its 2012 final rule implementing Stage 2 of the program that it was difficult for pathologists to meet the Meaningful Use requirements and granted a one year exception for 2015, the first year that penalties will be imposed. They now are asking that the exception be expanded to include the full five-year maximum allowed under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

"Pathologists have limited direct contact with patients and do not operate in EHRs," the letter states. "Instead, pathologists use sophisticated computerized laboratory information systems (LISs) to support the work of analyzing patient specimens and generating test results. These LISs exchange laboratory and pathology data with EHRs."

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1p18wLl

Source: Fierce EMR



Feature
Recommended Articles
This week GOP presidential candidate hopefuls turned their attention to the 2016 election as the next best chance to repeal Obamacare, and CMS released data revealing $6.5 billion payments to healthcare providers from drug and medical device makers in 2014.
The deal combines Humana's 3.2 million Medicare enrollees with Aetna's 1.26 million Medicare enrollees, giving the new combined company a strong position as the baby boomer population ages.
As co-pays and deductibles in Medicare and commercial health plans become more prevalent, so, too, does the temptation to waive them. But beware.
New delivery models related to the recent healthcare reform legislation may help drive up utilization, as discussed by Francois de Brantes, MS, MBA; Ateev Mehrotra, MD, MPH; and Arthur Vercillo, MD, FACS, in this seventh segment of the Healthcare Reform Stakeholders Summit, Spring 2015 series. They theorize that healthcare convenience and availability may actually lead to a loss in coordination of care.
A study published in Health Affairs has found that primary care physicians refer women Medicaid enrollees to fewer preventive services than do their counterparts with private insurance coverage.