Massachusetts' Law Set Stage for National Health Overhaul, Becomes a Template for Other States

Published Online: January 24, 2013
When Massachusetts adopted its landmark health care law in 2006, the goals were ambitious and the potential solutions complex.

More than 90 percent of its residents already had health insurance, but the state hoped to cover nearly everyone by plugging as many holes as possible in its system, short of a so-called single payer option. What resulted was a state law that became the blueprint for the 2010 federal Affordable Care Act signed by President Barack Obama.

Read the full story: http://wapo.st/UmvRsK

Source: The Washington Post

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