New Pump a 'Game-Changer' for Cancer Patients

Published Online: January 21, 2013
A British cancer patient has become the first ever to have a pump implanted in her body in a procedure that doctors believe could be a major breakthrough for treatment. Medical professionals claim that the experiment could be a "game-changer" for thousands of patients.

The pump is designed to get rid of the dangerous build-up of fluid caused by many common cancers, meaning that patients could avoid hospital visits, according to the Times. In the longer term it is hoped that the device will make it easier to track the ways in which cancer is changing so that doctors can respond with new treatments.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/11DTxNB

Source: The Telegraph

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