Next Up for Obamacare: Launching the Exchanges in 2014

Published Online: November 20, 2012
Now that the elections saved the health care law from the threat of repeal, the Obama administration and its backers are turning their attention toward getting the law right — before the next elections come around in 2014.

All eyes are on January 2014, when the health insurance exchanges — online portals where individuals and small businesses can get their health coverage — are slated to start covering millions of people. Consumers will have access to tax subsidies, if they qualify, to help them buy coverage, and almost everyone will be subject to the mandate to have insurance.

Read the full story: http://politi.co/T0WEHp

Source: Politico

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