Nurses' Work Environment May Influence Readmission Risk

Published Online: January 17, 2013
Better hospital work environments and staffing levels for nurses may lower the risk for Medicare readmissions, according to the results of a new survey.

For patients with 3 common conditions, 30-day readmission rates were significantly lower in hospitals with a good work environment compared with those with poor work environments, Matthew D. McHugh, PhD, JD, MPH, RN, and Chenjuan Ma, PhD, RN, from the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, report in an article published in the January issue of Medical Care. Readmission risk went up with each additional patient per nurse in the average nurse's workload.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/102pwSh

Source: Medscape Today

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