Official: Dollar-Driven Healthcare Causes Harm

U.S. patients not only are spending too much on medical treatments, there are still too many ways dollar-driven health care causes harm, according to a top official with the American Cancer Society.
Published Online: March 17, 2014

U.S. patients not only are spending too much on medical treatments, there are still too many ways dollar-driven health care causes harm, according to a top official with the American Cancer Society.

Dr. Otis Brawley, the cancer society's chief medical and scientific officer, told an audience of physicians-to-be last week that medicine's scientific basis too often takes a backseat to superfluous concerns.

An address to students at NYIT's School of Osteopathic Medicine in Old Westbury, the lecture was designed as one in a series of talks on provocative subjects in medical care. Brawley tackled high costs and the irrational use of medical resources. A lecture scheduled for later this year, featuring another speaker, will focus on the growing doctor shortage.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/NniQP8

Source: Newsday



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