Online Access To Docs Increases Office Visits, Study Finds

Published Online: November 21, 2012
Uncle Sam wants you to email your doctor. A federal law passed in 2009 says that physicians have to start offering their patients online communication, or Medicare will start docking how much it pays them in the future.

Some patients hope that having online access to their doctors will mean they can cut down on how often they have to go to the doctor's office. But new research suggests that patients with online access actually schedule more office visits.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/10tkPDk

Source: Kaiser Health News (in collaboration with Colorado Public Radio and NPR)

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