Pneumococcal Vaccine Aids Young and Elderly Alike

Hospitalizations for to pneumococcal disease have been reduced since the introduction of the 7-valent vaccine (PCV7). The PCV7 vaccine has no only helped children, but the elderly as well.
Published Online: July 17, 2013
Hospitalizations for to pneumococcal disease have been reduced since the introduction of the 7-valent vaccine (PCV7). The PCV7 vaccine has no only helped children, but the elderly as well. Contemporary Pediatrics reports:

In the 10 years following the introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), hospitalizations for pneumococcal disease have been and remain drastically reduced, not just for children but also for adults and particularly for the elderly, according to a new report.

Using a nationwide inpatient sample database, researchers from Vanderbilt University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) looked at rates of pneumonia-related hospitalizations during the periods 1997 to 1999, before the introduction of the vaccine, and 2007 to 2009, well after the introduction of PCV7 in 2000, but before the switch to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in 2010.

Overall, in all age groups, the investigators calculated a 10.5% reduction in hospitalizations for pneumonia.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/1dELpOw



Feature
Recommended Articles
Increasing health insurance enrollment is only one part of the goal of the Affordable Care Act—the law also aims to improve population health and lower healthcare costs, but less attention has been paid to these critical steps.
Drug manufacturers often fail to stick to the 15-day timeframe of reporting serious adverse events to the FDA, a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine reports.
Viruses, not bacteria, are the most commonly detected pathogen in US adults hospitalized with pneumonia; however, neither viruses nor bacteria were detected in the majority of these patients despite current diagnostic tests.
Healthcare spending for children covered by employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) rising faster than the rest of the ESI population, Health Care Cost Institute report finds.
The report found that Medicare Part B spending per beneficiary in 340B hospitals was more than twice that of hospitals outside the program. Groups such as the Community Oncology Alliance have long warned that the 340B program, while essential, has grown beyond its original intent.