Survey: Few ACOs Ready For Financial Risk

Published Online: August 17, 2012
Few hospitals interested in becoming accountable care organizations are ready to take on financial risk, according to a survey released Friday from The Commonwealth Fund.

“We’re really still at the very beginning of the adoption curve of the ACO model,” says lead author Anne-Marie Audet, who researches health system quality and efficiency at Commonwealth. “The challenge is that hospitals are still not ready to assume financial risk.”

Read the full story: http://tinyurl.com/8g89z59

Source: Kaiser Health News

Feature
Recommended Articles
New delivery models related to the recent healthcare reform legislation may help drive up utilization, as discussed by Francois de Brantes, MS, MBA; Ateev Mehrotra, MD, MPH; and Arthur Vercillo, MD, FACS, in this seventh segment of the Healthcare Reform Stakeholders Summit, Spring 2015 series. They theorize that healthcare convenience and availability may actually lead to a loss in coordination of care.
The fact that a small percentage of the population accounts for roughly half of healthcare spending in the United States is not new information. Now a new white paper from the Health Care Transformation Task Force has taken a look at what healthcare systems can do to identify these individuals in order to better manage their care and lower spending.
When The American Journal of Managed Care’s ACO and Emerging Healthcare Delivery Coalition met for the most recent Web-based session, the speakers discussed the importance of accountable care organizations as CMS moves forward with new reimbursement schemes and managing high-risk patients through coordinated care.
Heterogeneity in Medicaid coverage of the anti-viral agent sofosbuvir is rampant across the United States, with varying reimbursement criteria and lack of conformation to recommendations by professional infectious disease organizations.
This week the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the government in King v. Burwell, preserving access to healthcare subsidies for millions of Americans, and the high cost of cancer drug was in the spotlight.