Tech Workers See Opportunity as Health-Care Law Kicks In

Published Online: November 28, 2012
John Tricas said he heard opportunity knocking and learned networking software two decades ago, when it was the “next big thing.” Now he senses a similar opening as the health-care overhaul law takes effect.

In September, the 56-year-old information-technology worker took a job troubleshooting issues doctors, nurses and other users are having with a new government-funded electronic-records system at a Raleigh, North Carolina, health-care company.

Read the full story: http://buswk.co/SphQtw

Source: Bloomberg Businessweek

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