Value-Based Insurance Plans Can Up Rx Adherence

Value-based insurance design (VBID) plans with certain features aside from solely lowering cost sharing can increase medication adherence, according to a study.
Published Online: March 07, 2014
Value-based insurance design (VBID) plans with certain features aside from solely lowering cost sharing can increase medication adherence, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

Niteesh K. Choudhry, M.D., Ph.D., from Harvard University in Boston, and colleagues evaluated 76 VBID plans introduced by a large pharmacy benefit manager from 2007 to 2010.

The researchers found that VBID plans that made a significantly greater impact on adherence were more generous, targeted high-risk patients, offered wellness programs, did not offer disease management programs, and made the benefit available only for medication ordered by mail. The effects of these features were as large as four to five percentage points, compared to plans without these characteristics.

Read the full story here:http://bit.ly/1hPzT7v

Source: Doctor's Lounge



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