Currently Viewing:
Newsroom
Currently Reading
Patient Navigators Reduce ED Visits, Hospital Readmissions
January 27, 2015 – Laura Joszt
Pharma Adapts to the New Health Economy
January 26, 2015 – Laura Joszt
OIG Report Finds CMS Inadequately Prepared for HealthCare.gov Launch in 2013
January 25, 2015 – Laura Joszt
The Way to Improved Patient Safety, Reduced Costs Is Transparency, Report Finds
January 24, 2015 – Laura Joszt
Early Detection, Cutting Edge Treatments for Breast Cancer Patients
January 23, 2015
5 Investment Priorities for the State Health Innovation Plans
January 22, 2015 – Laura Joszt
Medicaid Reimbursement Increases Improved Access to Care
January 22, 2015 – Laura Joszt
New Arkansas Governor Plans to Replace Medicaid Expansion After 2016
January 22, 2015 – Laura Joszt
State of the Union Calls for More Investments in Personalized Medicine
January 21, 2015 – Laura Joszt

Patient Navigators Reduce ED Visits, Hospital Readmissions

Laura Joszt
Patient navigators in 3 health systems were able to reduce excessive emergency department visits by 43%, according to a 1-year pilot study by Accenture and the Highmark Foundation.
Patient navigators in 3 health systems were able to reduce excessive emergency department visits by 43%, according to a 1-year pilot study by Accenture and the Highmark Foundation.

In addition to the decrease in emergency department visits, one health system reported a 60% reduction in 30-day readmissions and another increased colonoscopy screenings by 13%. The pilot included 3 hospitals in western Pennsylvania.

“Patient navigation not only creates a one-to-one connection for the patient, it serves as a low-cost investment that delivers significant value to care delivery,” David Balderson, who leads patient navigation at Accenture, said in a statement.

The certified patient navigators in the pilot were laypersons who took on important non-clinical tasks, including picking up prescriptions from hospital pharmacies, arranging transportation, connecting patients to community resources, or conducting post-discharge follow-ups.

“The essence of patient navigation is our responsibility to use finite clinical resources wisely to deliver quality healthcare no matter people’s circumstances,” Harold Freeman, MD, founder of the Harold P. Freeman Patient Navigation Institute, said. “Its roots began in cancer care 2 decades ago, but the benefits of patient navigators are transferable, reaching beyond a single disease or income bracket.”

Unlike nurses, case managed, or clinical patient navigators, the patient navigators in the pilot were typically members of the community trained to help people manage non-clinical barriers that could cause patients to deviate from their care plan.

Their work offset clinicians’ tasks by 25%, which allowed them to focus more on patient care. Accenture expects patient navigator demand will nearly double in the next 3 years.

“In initiating the pilot program, we recognized the opportunity to improve and assure timely access to quality healthcare for the communities we serve, while creating sustainable employment opportunities,” Yvonne Cook, president of the Highmark Foundation, said. “We look forward to replicating the successes achieved in that study in other communities in the future.”

 
Copyright AJMC 2006-2019 Clinical Care Targeted Communications Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
x
Welcome the the new and improved AJMC.com, the premier managed market network. Tell us about yourself so that we can serve you better.
Sign Up