CMS to Private Insurers: Adopt Payment Reforms More Quickly

Leaders from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services think private insurers have been too slow to adopt payment reforms, but they would be best served by adopting value-based payment systems in tandem with CMS today.
Published Online: April 23, 2014
Leaders from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services think private insurers have been too slow to adopt payment reforms, but they would be best served by adopting value-based payment systems in tandem with CMS today.

Alignment between public and private payers is key to making value-based models work, in order to “provide consistent incentives to clinicians and organizations,” wrote Rahul Rajkumar, MD, JD, a CMS senior advisor; Patrick Conway, MD, CMS’ deputy innovation and quality administrator; and Marilyn Tavenner, CMS administrator, in a viewpoint article published online this week by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

That doesn’t mean private payers need to adopt provider contracts identical to CMS’ or replicate their models.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1jAmBtK

Source: Healthcare Payer News



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