CYRAMZA Meets Secondary Endpoints in Phase 3 REACH Trial for HCC

CYRAMZA™ (ramucirumab)did not meet its primary endpoint; overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm but was not statistically significant, in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, but meaningful improvements in key secondary endpoints of progression-free survival, overall response rate and time to progression were observed.
Published Online: June 11, 2014

Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) today announced that the Phase 3 REACH trial of CYRAMZA™ (ramucirumab) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, also known as liver cancer, did not meet its primary endpoint; overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm but was not statistically significant.  Encouraging single-agent CYRAMZA activity was observed, with meaningful improvements in key secondary endpoints of progression-free survival, overall response rate and time to progression.

The global, randomized, double-blind REACH trial compared CYRAMZA plus best supportive care to placebo plus best supportive care as a second-line treatment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after being treated with sorafenib in the first-line setting.  The top-line safety data were consistent with what was seen in previous single-agent CYRAMZA studies. The most common ( > 5% incidence) grade > /=3 adverse events occurring at a higher rate on the CYRAMZA arm compared to the control arm were hypertension and asthenia (fatigue).

"Although the REACH study did not achieve statistical significance for survival, we are encouraged by the efficacy seen overall, especially in specific subpopulations. We plan to discuss these results with regulatory authorities," said Richard Gaynor, M.D., senior vice president, product development and medical affairs for Lilly Oncology.

Source: Eli Lilly



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