NCCN Updates Guidelines for Hereditary Colon Cancer Testing

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has revised its medical guidelines to expand Lynch syndrome screening. Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon cancer in adults.
Published Online: March 05, 2014
Myriad Genetics, Inc. is pleased to note that the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has revised its medical guidelines to expand Lynch syndrome screening. Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon cancer in adults.

Myriad believes the new guidelines will dramatically expand the number of patients eligible for hereditary colon cancer testing, especially among at-risk asymptomatic patients for whom screening has historically been limited based upon prior guidelines and a lack of insurance reimbursement. Some of the key aspects of the new guidelines include:

  • A recommendation that all patients who meet a five percent or greater risk threshold for Lynch syndrome are appropriate for testing;
  • A recommendation against sequential testing for the five Lynch syndrome genes in lieu of panel testing; and
  • An acknowledgement that patients with cancer can proceed directly to sequencing tests without a complicated tissue screening algorithm.
Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1f3tyki

Source: Myriad

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