NCCN Updates Guidelines for Hereditary Colon Cancer Testing

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has revised its medical guidelines to expand Lynch syndrome screening. Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon cancer in adults.
Published Online: March 05, 2014
Myriad Genetics, Inc. is pleased to note that the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has revised its medical guidelines to expand Lynch syndrome screening. Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon cancer in adults.

Myriad believes the new guidelines will dramatically expand the number of patients eligible for hereditary colon cancer testing, especially among at-risk asymptomatic patients for whom screening has historically been limited based upon prior guidelines and a lack of insurance reimbursement. Some of the key aspects of the new guidelines include:

  • A recommendation that all patients who meet a five percent or greater risk threshold for Lynch syndrome are appropriate for testing;
  • A recommendation against sequential testing for the five Lynch syndrome genes in lieu of panel testing; and
  • An acknowledgement that patients with cancer can proceed directly to sequencing tests without a complicated tissue screening algorithm.
Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1f3tyki

Source: Myriad

Feature
Recommended Articles
A review published before FDA's vote on alirocumab outlines how editorials in 2 major journals were reflected in subsequent votes by advisory panels.
Physicians at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital have published results from a proof-of-concept study that used mass spectrometry in almost real-time to detect and delineate pituitary tumors from normal tissue.
Genevieve Kumapley, PharmD, BCOP, reflects on the significant out-of-pocket costs associated with oral oncolytics and suggests how a change in benefit design can help patients afford the treatments they need.
During this segment, Genevieve Kumapley, PharmD, BCOP, discusses the significance of introducing a self-care plan to patients who are undergoing cancer treatment.
Two inexpensive generic drugs have been shown to reduce breast cancer deaths in postmenopausal women, according to studies published in The Lancet.