American College of Cardiology 2013
According to the American College of Cardiology, the focus at ACC.13 will be on "the transformation of cardiovascular care — from discovery to delivery." Educational content at ACC.13 will be organized in 16 "learning pathways" that feature "topics ranging from congenital to intervention, imaging to heart failure, prevention to quality care and all the topics in between."
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Information about ACC.13
News and updates about ACC.13, the 2013 Scientific Session of the American College of Cardiology.
Adult Hospital Admissions for Congenital Heart Disease Are Increasing
Annual adult admissions for congenital heart disease are increasing and approaching that of pediatric admissions, according to a study published online March 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.
Seasonable Variation Observed in Lipid Profiles
Considerable seasonal variation has been observed in lipid profiles, according to a study to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.
Weight Loss Linked to Adverse Outcomes with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy
For patients with mild symptoms of heart failure implanted with cardiac resynchronization therapy with cardioverter defibrillator, weight loss is associated with increased risk of heart failure or death, according to a study to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.
Day 1
Harlan Krumholz, MD, Discusses Health Policy and Prevention
"There is often a disconnect between research and policy," said Harlan Krumholz, MD, Department of Internal Medicine/Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.
Claims Data, Nurses Have Pivotal Roles in the Future of Healthcare Delivery
The Affordable Care Act has left many healthcare professionals pondering the future of healthcare delivery. This all-encompassing discussion has many layers; however, at the American College of Cardiology 62nd Annual Scientific Session and Expo, a panel of experts discussed some of the specific variables-such as the need for better data and a more prominent role for nurses-as they relate to healthcare delivery in this transitory time.
Paul Hauptman, MD, Addresses Patient-Focused Outcomes in Heart Failure
Paul Hauptman, MD, Professor of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Health Management & Policy, School of Public Health, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, says that clinicians tend to focus on non-patient focused outcomes.
Grand-Aides Aim to Reduce Readmissions and Improve Transitions in Care
Readmissions are one of the many Achilles' heels of healthcare. Whether it is a failure in communication, problems with medication adherence, or an overall lack of quality healthcare delivery, readmissions cause many headaches within the system. Saturday at the American College of Cardiology 62nd Annual Scientific Session and Expo featured a discussion on successful transitions of care to help prevent readmissions.
HPS2-THRIVE Trial Shows Little Benefit, Serious Risks for Niacin Treatment for Cardiovascular Disease
Landmark study results presented at ACC.13 reveal patients with vascular disease treated with niacin therapy face increased risk of myopathy and other adverse events.
Delayed Stenting Improves Outcomes in Patients with Patients with ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction
Study results presented at ACC.13, the 62nd Annual Scientific Session & Expo of the American College of Cardiology, reveal that in selected STEMI patients, deferred stenting may reduce no-reflow and thrombotic events compared with immediate stenting.
Clopidogrel Load and Atorvastatin Reload May Prevent Ischemic Cerebral Events in Patients Undergoing Protected Carotid Stenting
Results of the ARMYDA-9 CAROTID trial indicate that loading with 600 mg clopidogrel and high-dose atorvastatin in carotid stent patients independently result in improved neurological outcomes.
Financial Incentives Enhance Sustained Weight Loss
Financial incentives can enhance sustained weight loss, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.
Gastric Artery Embolization Viable in Humans
Left gastric artery embolization seems safe and effective for weight loss in humans, according to a first-in-man study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.
Stressful Events Increase the Incidence of Acute Myocardial Infarction
Stressful events, including hurricanes, earthquakes, and financial crises, correlate with increased incidence of acute myocardial infarction, according to three studies to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.
Day 2
Pharmacologic Considerations for New Oral Anticoagulants
The American College of Cardiology 62nd Annual Scientific Session & Expo featured a daylong program on advances in pharmacology. One session in particular, "Pharmacologic Considerations with the New Oral Anticoagulants," focused on the importance of individualized therapy when it comes to selecting antithrombotic therapy for atrial fibrillation.
Early Intervention Key to Combating Childhood Obesity
Childhood obesity is an epidemic in the United States, and one that not only endangers the health of children, but also costs our healthcare system a great deal of time, money, and resources when considering the comorbid conditions that often present as a result.
Michael Farkouh, MD, Talks about the Prevention of Diabetes Mellitus
Michael Farkouh, MD, Director of Clinical Trials and Associate Professor of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, says that there are many strategies to both prevent and control diabetes mellitus, but he notes that obesity prevention is key.
Peter Berger, MD, Discusses the Challenges of Treating Acute Coronary Syndrome
Peter Berger, MD, Chairman of Cardiology and Co-Director of the Geisinger Heart & Vascular Institute, Director, Cardiovascular Center for Clinical Research at Geisinger Clinic, thinks the biggest challenges that physicians face when treating patients with acute coronary syndrome is individualizing treatment for patients.
New Version of Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement System Produces Improved Outcomes Compared to Original Version
Results from the PARTNER II trial show improvements in 30-day mortality and stroke rates in patients with aortic stenosis who are not surgical candidates who were treated using a newer version of the Sapien transcatheter aortic valve replacement system.
Modern Technology Reveals Atherosclerosis Was Prevalent in Ancient Populations
Investigators in the expanded HORUS trial using CT scans of ancient mummies from multiple populations and geographic regions report finding evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in nearly one-third of samples.
Double Kissing Crush Stent Technique Produces Better Outcomes than Culotte Stenting in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease
Study results presented at ACC.13 show that patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease treated with double kissing crush stenting experienced fewer cases of restenosis and other major adverse events compared to patients who received culotte stenting.
VIDEO: Many Heart Failure Patients Cannot Tolerate Recommended Doses of Beta Blockers
Jeffrey S. Borer, MD, of the Howard Gilman Institute for Heart Valve Disease, discusses treating patients with heart failure with beta-blockers and whether there are any patients in this group who are not good candidates for this treatment.
VIDEO: Beta Blocker Tolerability, Efficacy Key in Selection, But Vary Across Drugs
Jeffrey S. Borer, MD, of the Howard Gilman Institute for Heart Valve Disease, discusses the factors cardiologists consider in selecting specific beta blockers for heart failure patients.
VIDEO: Worldwide SHIFT Study Trumps Predecessors on Link Between Heart Rate, Heart Failure Success
Jeffrey S. Borer, MD, of the Howard Gilman Institute for Heart Valve Disease, discusses the SHIFT study’s value for cardiologists over various recent heart failure trials.
Day 3
Jeffrey Berger, MD, Addresses Adherence in Acute Coronary Syndrome
Jeffrey Berger, MD, Assistant Professor, NYU Langone Medical Center, says that improving adherence of therapies in patients with acute coronary syndrome is a major goal.
Frederick Masoudi, MD, Addresses Quality of Care in Cardiovascular Disease
Frederick Masoudi, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, says there has been an increase in focus on outcomes. They allow for systems accountability and focus on patient care.
FDA Should Look to Airline Industry for Patient Protection Improvements
One of the more popular sessions at this year's American College of Cardiology 62nd Annual Scientific Session and Expo featured a discussion on regulatory oversight and the need for better protection of patients' interests.
The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Duplicate Testing
The electronic health record (EHR) has been touted as a tool that has the power to improve the quality of patient care, reduce costs, and improve overall efficiency in healthcare. At this year's American College of Cardiology 62nd Annual Scientific Session and Expo, information was presented from a study challenging that long-held belief.
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Analog Cuts Heart Failure Events in Diabetes
For adults with diabetes, use of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs is associated with a reduced risk of heart failure hospitalization, all-cause hospitalization and all-cause mortality, according to a study by Henry Ford Hospital physicians.
Darbepoetin Alfa Doesn't Improve Heart Failure Outcome
For patients with systolic heart failure and mild-to-moderate anemia, treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa is not associated with improved clinical outcomes, a study in Sweden found.
Cangrelor Beats Plavix in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
In primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), cangrelor correlates with reduced ischemic events, and prehospital fibrinolysis with timely angiography is effective for reperfusion in patients unable to undergo primary PCI within one hour after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to two studies.
On-Site Surgery Presence Doesn't Alter Nonemergency Cardiac Outcomes
For patients undergoing nonemergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), clinical outcomes at 30 days and one year are similar with and without on-site cardiac surgery services, according to a study published online March 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Aliskiren Provides No Benefit as Add-on Therapy for Patients Hospitalized with Heart Failure
Results from the ASTRONAUT trial show that adding aliskiren to standard therapy for chronic heart failure does not improve mortality or rehospitalization rates.
Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Is Associated with Similar Outcomes at One Year as On-Pump Surgery in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease
Results from the CORONARY trial show no significant difference at one year between patients with CAD who underwent on-pump vs. off-pump CABG.
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Is an Effective Alternative to Surgical Replacement
Data from the PARTNER cohort A trial show transcatheter aortic valve replacement produces similar mortality rates at one year compared with the standard procedure.
Day 4
Digoxin Cuts 30-Day Admission for Heart Failure
For older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, digoxin is associated with a significant reduction in 30-day all-cause hospital admission, with no significant effect on mortality.
Patient Preference-Based Heart Treatment Improves Depression
A centralized, patient preference-based program for depression care decreases symptoms in patients with post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to a study published online March 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
High-Dose Vitamins Don't Reduce Cardiac Events
For adults with previous myocardial infarction, high-dose oral vitamin and mineral supplementation is not associated with a reduction in cardiac events, according to a study presented at ACC.13.
Ranolazine Relieves Chest Pain in Type 2 Diabetes
Ranolazine reduces chest pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and angina, according to a study presented at ACC.13.
Shared-Care Treatment Aids Heart Failure in Older Patients
For older adults at risk of heart failure, B-type natriuretic peptide (NP)-guided screening and shared-care treatment is associated with a reduction in the prevalence of left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure.