3 Pathways to Patient-Centered Care

A new report highlights the ways hospitals can identify and address sources of "avoidable suffering" and ultimately improve the patient experience.
Published Online: May 23, 2014

A new report highlights the ways hospitals can identify and address sources of "avoidable suffering" and ultimately improve the patient experience.

Press Ganey's 2014 Strategic Insights report, "Reducing Suffering: The Path to Patient-Centered Care," presents three levels of analytics that improve patient care and increase engagement. To achieve patient-centered care, hospitals can no longer just focus on treating patients' illnesses, according to the report. Instead, they must also address patient suffering, which involves treating the physical side effects of illness as well as mental ones, such as fear, anxiety, confusion and frustration.

Providers must take steps to eliminate a patient's avoidable suffering, which is associated with healthcare dysfunction, such as a misdiagnosis or a delayed diagnosis, according to the report. But they also must attempt to mitigate inherent suffering that is associated with a treatment or diagnosis, such as postoperative pain or loss of function.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1ognSe6

Source: Firece Healthcare



Feature
Recommended Articles
Physicians at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital have published results from a proof-of-concept study that used mass spectrometry in almost real-time to detect and delineate pituitary tumors from normal tissue.
Genevieve Kumapley, PharmD, BCOP, reflects on the significant out-of-pocket costs associated with oral oncolytics and suggests how a change in benefit design can help patients afford the treatments they need.
All-cause mortality and hospitalization rates and inpatient expenditures among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries decreased from 1999 to 2013.
Legislative action on Medicare’s Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) could have important implications for physicians, especially in terms of financial risk. In the 13th part of the Healthcare Reform Stakeholder Summit, panelists Francois de Brantes, MS, MBA, Ateev Mehrotra, MD, MPH, and Arthur Vercillo, MD, FACS, delved into the topic of SGR reform.
Two inexpensive generic drugs have been shown to reduce breast cancer deaths in postmenopausal women, according to studies published in The Lancet.