ACOs Show Uneven Progress

Just over half of the 114 organizations to join one of two Medicare accountable care organization efforts in 2012 report no decrease in health spending below targets during their first 12 months.
Published Online: April 07, 2014

The first numbers for Medicare's biggest accountable care experiment under the Affordable Care Act show mixed results for improving quality and reducing costs.

Just over half of the 114 organizations to join one of two Medicare accountable care organization (ACO) efforts in 2012 report no decrease in health spending below targets during their first 12 months trying to do so, according to newly released CMS data. Another 29 reduced spending enough during the first 12 months to keep some of the savings.

The results are in line with Medicare's smaller test of accountable care. In the CMS Innovation Center's Pioneer ACO model, also launched in 2012, nine of the 32 organizations left the program after its first year, and nine of the remaining 23 organizations saved money.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/OrzQnL

Source: Health Leaders Media



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