Arizona Offers 'Sneak Peak' At Costs Of Shifting Kids Off CHIP

Families of Arizona children who were forced to switch from the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to private plans sold in the federal marketplace are likely paying more and getting fewer benefits, according to a study by Georgetown University researchers released Thursday.
Published Online: May 08, 2014
Families of Arizona children who were forced to switch from the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to private plans sold in the federal marketplace are likely paying more and getting fewer benefits, according to a study by Georgetown University researchers released Thursday.

Millions of families who are ineligible for Medicaid could soon face the same choice if Congress chooses not to extend funding for the state-federal CHIP program when it expires in October 2015. Arizona was the first and only state to end its children’s insurance program — because its state legislature acted before the 2010 Affordable Care Act banned states from reducing children’s health coverage.

“Arizona provides us a sneak peak of what would happen if CHIP goes away,” said Joan Alker, executive director of the Georgetown University Center on Children and Families which produced the report.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1mGdf2G

Source: Kaiser Health News



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