CVS Wins Plaudits for Vowing to Stop Tobacco Sales

Drugstore giant CVS Caremark's decision to stop selling tobacco products at its stores is being hailed as a victory among public health advocates, a move they predict will force CVS competitors to follow suit as they look to play a growing part in the delivery of the country's healthcare.
Published Online: February 06, 2014

Drugstore giant CVS Caremark's decision to stop selling tobacco products at its stores is being hailed as a victory among public health advocates, a move they predict will force CVS competitors to follow suit as they look to play a growing part in the delivery of the country's healthcare.

Major competitors, for the moment though, are not rushing to join CVS in the move away from selling tobacco products.

“This decision underscores our role in the evolving healthcare system,” said CVS spokesman Michael DeAngelis. “Now more than ever, pharmacies are on the front line of healthcare, becoming more involved in chronic disease management to help patients with high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. All of these conditions are made worse by smoking and cigarettes have no place in a setting where healthcare is delivered.”

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1ndkFcA

Source: Modern Healthcare



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