Healthcare Providers Oppose Medicare Cuts in Obama's 2015 Budget

President Barack Obama is proposing more than $400 billion in cuts to Medicare over the next decade in his fiscal 2015 budget, an almost identical amount to what he recommended last year. But those cuts are heavily weighted toward future years, with only $3.5 billion occurring in 2015.
Published Online: March 06, 2014
President Barack Obama is proposing more than $400 billion in cuts to Medicare over the next decade in his fiscal 2015 budget, an almost identical amount to what he recommended last year. But those cuts are heavily weighted toward future years, with only $3.5 billion occurring in 2015.

The president's fiscal blueprint also includes $73.7 billion in discretionary spending for HHS in fiscal 2015. That's a reduction of $6.1 billion—or 7.6%—from the current budget.

The cost of running HealthCare.gov is pegged at $1.8 billion next year, with two-thirds of that covered by user fees.

A way to pay for a fix to the volatile Medicare sustainable growth rate is not outlined, even though the budget lauds efforts to find a solution to the issue.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1ia7wjj

Source: Modern Healthcare

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