Ipilumumab: Potential in the Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

An international study carried out with involvement of the MedUni Vienna is giving hope to patients with advanced prostate cancer. In just a few years' time, Ipilumumab could be approved as a treatment for the world's third-most common type of cancer.
Published Online: May 27, 2014
The immunotherapeutic agent Ipilumumab has been shown to have a markedly positive effect in the treatment of patients who are resistant to conventional hormone treatments and chemotherapy. These are the words of a core statement from a study, recently published in the highly respected journal "The Lancet Oncology”, which was set up based on collaboration between the world’s leading centres for the research and treatment of prostate cancer. 

The scientists investigated the extent to which immunotherapy with this agent is also suitable for the more common type of advanced prostate cancer. The medication is already being successfully used as immunotherapy for advanced melanoma – a comparatively rare type of cancer.

Read the complete report here: 
http://bit.ly/1kcjt6W

Source: Medical University of Vienna





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