Medical Homes, ACOs Offer Better Business Models

The patient-centered medical home model in Arkansas, which has more than 600 participating providers, helps the state's Medicaid program incentivize quality care instead of paying for volume of services.
Published Online: May 23, 2014
The patient-centered medical home model in Arkansas, which has more than 600 participating providers, helps the state's Medicaid program incentivize quality care instead of paying for volume of services.

Arkansas officials designed the PCMH payment structure to support primary care doctors in the state, who often rely on high volumes of acute care, to instead implement team-based strategies, coordinate chronic care delivery and achieve better patient outcomes, according to a Health Affairs blog post.

Since the state has a wide array of practices, ranging from highly efficient primary care doctors to clinics with high rates of avoidable emergency room admissions, officials knew that simply rewarding doctors for reducing their spending would have penalized the efficient practices.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1mZMMiD

Source: Fierce Healthpayer


Feature
Recommended Articles
Fifty years ago today, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the law that created Medicare and Medicaid, setting in motion not only the greatest change in healthcare in the nation's history at that point, but also a lasting change for society.
Increasing health insurance enrollment is only one part of the goal of the Affordable Care Act—the law also aims to improve population health and lower healthcare costs, but less attention has been paid to these critical steps.
A quirk in Alaska law allowed Governor Bill Walker to move ahead without support from the legislature.
While growing marketplace enrollment in state-based exchanges is important, retaining enrollees is equally so, and a new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Urban Institute analyzed the renewal process for 6 states.
When Providence-Swedish Health Alliance signed with Boeing to create a unique employer-sponsored accountable care organization, figuring out the logistics of the model took some time, according to Joseph Gifford, MD, CEO of Providence-Swedish Health Alliance.