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After Pembrolizumab, Promising Results With Nivolumab in NSCLC
Phase 2 results from the Checkmate-063 trial found that treatment with the PD-1 inhibitor Nivolumab (Opdivo) resulted in a median OS of 8.2 months in NSCLC patients who had received 2 prior treatments.
Report Outlines How to Improve Measures for Accountable Care
Gaps in accountable measure sets exist among some of the most prevalent and costly conditions, according to a new report from the National Pharmaceutical Council and Discern Health.
Healthcare Transformation and the Price of Pharmaceuticals
Panelists discussed the price of pharmaceuticals and controlling the cost of care at the 64th Annual Roy A. Bowers Pharmaceutical Conference: A Measured Approach—Health Care Delivery and Transformation in a Metric Driven World, held by Rutgers University.
EMA Grants Orphan Status to Kiadis Pharma's Immuno-oncology Molecule
The European Medicines Agency granted an orphan status to ATIR, a T-cell immunotherapy-based medicinal product being developed to treat blood cancers.
Mental Health Issues Overshadow Breast Cancer Survivorship
The Danish study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, identified a 70% greater risk of severe depression in the first year after diagnosis.
Test Predicts Benefit of Extended Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients
bioTheranostics, Inc’s Breast Cancer Index, a genomic test quantifying the risk of breast cancer recurrence and predicting which patients will likely benefit from extended endocrine therapy, will be covered by Medicare.
UnitedHealth Continues Its Acquisition Spree
Optum, UHC's technology and services subsidiary, has bought Allere's wellness subsidiaries.
Increased Incidence of T1DM in Young White Children
The report, published in the journal Diabetes, found that children between 5 to 9 years of age were the hardest hit.
Privately Insured Consumers Spending More on Fewer Medical Services
Despite using fewer medical services, privately insured Americans spent more money on these services in 2013, according to a report from the Health Care Cost Institute. The average enrollee in an employer health plan increased spending by 3.9% last year.
Dr Karen B. DeSalvo Not Leaving ONC Just Yet
The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) seemed to be in dire straits as its leadership slowly left for other jobs. However, despite Dr DeSalvo’s new position within HHS, she will maintain her leadership position in ONC, according to a new report.
Prostate Cancer Screening Remains Highly Debated
While the USPSTF recommended against screening for prostate cancer, citing the high rate of false positives, complications from biopsy, and side-effects of aggressive treatment for a sometimes slowly-progressing disease, several medical organizations disagree.
After Drones and a Smart Eye Device, Google Introduces An Early Disease Tracer
Google is aiming to diagnose cancers, impending heart attacks or strokes and other diseases, at a much earlier stage than is currently possible.
From Diagnostics to Cancer Drug Costs, Nothing’s Off Limits at AJMCLive’s Patient-Centered Oncology Care
The toughest topics in cancer care will be on tap November 13-14, 2014, in Baltimore, Maryland, when AJMCLive presents Patient-Centered Oncology Care. If you’ve followed the discussion among pharmaceutical leaders, oncologists, and payers over access to care, you’ll want to join stakeholders to discuss how to ensure patients get what they need while controlling costs.
AMA Expresses Concerns Over ONC Departures
The American Medical Association voiced concerns over the fact that in addition to the departure of Karen. B. DeSalvo, MD, MPH, several other senior staff have recently left the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.
Scheduled Steep Medicaid Cuts Put Access to Care at Risk
If the current payment parity program is allowed to expire at the end of the year, doctors will be forced to limit the number of new Medicaid patients they can afford to take on, according to 4 medical associations.
Simeprevir Responsible for Deaths in Japanese Hepatitis C Patients
A spike in the blood bilirubin levels resulting in hepatic dysfunction and/or renal impairment was determined as the cause of death.
CTFPHC: Do Not Use PSA to Screen for Prostate Cancer
The guideline, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, recommends against using PSA to screen for prostate cancer, pointing to the high risk of false positives and overdiagnosis.
Nanodevice to Help Titrate and Individualize Chemotherapy
A miniature device can measure a patient's blood for methotrexate, a commonly used but potentially toxic cancer drug.
Healthcare Price Transparency Decreases Costs Up to 14%
Calls for greater healthcare pricing transparency have been gaining steam. A new study in JAMA found use of a private price transparency platform was associated with lower claims payments for 3 common medical services.
Breast Cancer Risk Increased Following Chest Irradiation in Children
Radiation exposure due to chest irradiation in women who had childhood Wilms tumor increased their susceptibility to developing breast cancer later in life.
Merck's Rapid Strides With Pembrolizumab
Today, Merck announced that Keytruda has been granted breakthrough therapy designation for treating patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-negative and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement-negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Scientists Identify a Novel Wnt Signaling Regulator in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancers
The gene mutation in RNF43, previously missed in The Cancer Genome Atlas study, was identified in 20% of colorectal and endometrial cancers.
Breakthrough Designation for Merck's Keytruda in NSCLC
Recently approved as second-line treatment of metastatic melanoma, following resistance to ipilimumab, the FDA has now designated Keytruda as breakthrough therapy to treat EGFR-mutation and ALK-rearrangement negative NSCLC patients who have pr0gressed following platinum-based therapy.
EHRs Increase Administrative Work for Physicians
Electronic health records could actually increase the physicians’ bureaucratic burdens, which already consume one-sixth of their time, according to a study by City University of New York professors.
Hospital Consolidation Is Increasing Patient Costs
Hospital consolidation for the purpose of improving patient care coordination and reducing cost of care is backfiring, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.