Post-discharge Care Plans Promote Use of Primary Care

Providing a solid base of primary-care service and coordinating specialty care for high-risk patients has been advocated as a method of lowering overall healthcare costs. Doing so would presumably reduce repeat hospitalization and emergency department visits.
Published Online: February 11, 2014
Providing a solid base of primary-care service and coordinating specialty care for high-risk patients has been advocated as a method of lowering overall healthcare costs. Doing so would presumably reduce repeat hospitalization and emergency department visits. A new study in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that such an approach does, indeed, work.

Researchers with University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine found that when low-income uninsured or Medicaid beneficiary patients at two Philadelphia hospitals were assisted by community health workers in developing an individual recovery plan, they were more likely to have a primary-care visit within 14 days of discharge and to report high-quality post-discharge communication.

Recently, research from the CMS Innovation Center received criticism for its lack of scientific rigor, but the University of Pennsylvania study was a randomized trial in which 222 patients received an individualized discharge plan from community health workers between April 10, 2011, and Oct. 30, 2012, and 224 who did not during that period.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1h7RsCp

Source: Modern Healthcare

Feature
Recommended Articles
Patient safety is often at risk during the emergency department to inpatient physician handoff process, which can be subject to complex challenges.
The diagnosis and management of patients with dementing illnesses can be challenging, but the cost of misdiagnosing dementia as Alzheimer’s disease can be as high as $14,000 a year, according to a study published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia.
A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine shows that grip strength of young, healthy adults could prove useful in the diagnosis of diabetes and hypertension.
The introduction of biosimilars into the US market will not have a large impact on treatment costs until the volume of biosimiliars for different therapies increases, predicted Jennifer Malin, MD, medical director for oncology at Anthem.
The most recent issue of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report analyzed the first data available on the functional types of disability in a state-based health survey and determined prevalence of functional disability.