Post-discharge Care Plans Promote Use of Primary Care

Providing a solid base of primary-care service and coordinating specialty care for high-risk patients has been advocated as a method of lowering overall healthcare costs. Doing so would presumably reduce repeat hospitalization and emergency department visits.
Published Online: February 11, 2014
Providing a solid base of primary-care service and coordinating specialty care for high-risk patients has been advocated as a method of lowering overall healthcare costs. Doing so would presumably reduce repeat hospitalization and emergency department visits. A new study in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that such an approach does, indeed, work.

Researchers with University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine found that when low-income uninsured or Medicaid beneficiary patients at two Philadelphia hospitals were assisted by community health workers in developing an individual recovery plan, they were more likely to have a primary-care visit within 14 days of discharge and to report high-quality post-discharge communication.

Recently, research from the CMS Innovation Center received criticism for its lack of scientific rigor, but the University of Pennsylvania study was a randomized trial in which 222 patients received an individualized discharge plan from community health workers between April 10, 2011, and Oct. 30, 2012, and 224 who did not during that period.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1h7RsCp

Source: Modern Healthcare

Feature
Recommended Articles
Christine K. Cassel, MD, president and CEO of the National Quality Forum, sent her best wishes to The American Journal of Managed Care for its 20th year anniversary in publication.
The world of value-based purchasing needs to quickly adopt the use of electronic health records and their ability to share data around a single patient, according to Christine K. Cassel, MD, president and CEO of the National Quality Forum.
Bruce Feinberg, DO, vice president and chief medical office at Cardinal Health Specialty Solutions, explains why he attends the sessions at Patient-Centered Oncology Care.
California’s recent initiatives to address the impact of high priced hepatitis C drugs could not have come at a better time, as a new analysis estimates that the state’s projected specialty drug expenditure would be $4.77 billion in the next year alone.
Aetna's purchase of Humana would create a managed care company with $115 billion in revenues, of which 56% would be from government business. In addition, the combined company would have the largest enrollment of members on public exchanges, with 1.7 million members.