Using Techy Incentives to Improve Medication Adherence

Medication adherence service provider HealthPrize, run by former Yale Medical School professor and neurosurgeon Katrina Firlik and lawyer Tom Kottler, hopes to raise the bar for patients' medication adherence. HealthPrize web and mobile platforms will utilize various incentives and technology to award patients for proper adherence
Published Online: July 17, 2013
Medication adherence service provider HealthPrize, run by former Yale Medical School professor and neurosurgeon Katrina Firlik and lawyer Tom Kottler, hopes to raise the bar for patients' medication adherence. HealthPrize web and mobile platforms will utilize various incentives and technology to award patients for proper adherence. Forbes reports:

A doctor and a lawyer quit their respective professions to try to get a start-up off the ground. Can they succeed?

In the case of Norwalk, Conn,-based medication adherence service provider, HealthPrize, the doctor is former Yale Medical School professor and neurosurgeon, Katrina Firlik, and the lawyer is Tom Kottler. After listening to them discuss HealthPrize on July 11, I pondered whether this start-up was the best use of their talents.

HealthPrize wants to make patients fill their prescriptions and take the medication that they are prescribed. HealthPrize runs on the web and mobile platforms and “combines the power of financial incentives, education, reminders, and fun” by tapping into three branches of science and technology: ”behavioral economics, gaming dynamics, and consumer marketing.” HealthPrize encourages users to provide daily compliance data, verifies their prescription refills, and “rewards them for adherence.”

Read the full story: http://onforb.es/18iMPxM

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