Currently Viewing:
AMCP 2017
Currently Reading
Dr Jennifer Graff on How Payers Make Decisions
August 01, 2017
Dr Jacqueline Glover: Financial Knowledge Is Part of Informed Consent
July 10, 2017
Laura Topor Explains the Value of Real-Time Benefit Transactions
June 27, 2017
Dr Jacqueline Glover: Clinicians' Obligations of Justice Regarding Costs of Care
June 24, 2017
Dr Lou Garrison Discusses Challenges of Working With Real-World Data
June 16, 2017
Dr Neil Minkoff Explains How 340B Impacts Pharmacies and Payers Differently
June 15, 2017
Dr Matthew Pickering on Working With Health Plans on Measure Implementation
June 09, 2017
Laura Topor: Clearing Up Misconceptions About e-Prescribing
June 07, 2017
Dr Jacqueline Glover Discusses the Complicated Balance of Ethics in Drug Trials
June 05, 2017
Dr Richard J. Willke Discusses Challenges of Working With Real-World Data
June 02, 2017
Susan A. Cantrell Explains the Necessity of Pre- and Post-Approval Communications
May 31, 2017
Dr Neil Minkoff Discusses Evolution and Consequences of 340B Programs
May 30, 2017
Dr Doug Hillblom Discusses Legislative Pushes Toward e-Prescribing
May 25, 2017
Dr Matthew Pickering Describes Challenges of New Measure Implementation
May 24, 2017
Dr Aimee Tharaldson Discusses the Orphan Drug Approval Trend
May 22, 2017
Dr Gail Bridges on the Importance of Real-World Results Matching Clinical Trial Outcomes
May 21, 2017
Dr Liz Zhou Discusses Real-World Implications of Toujeo Switching Trial
May 19, 2017
Dr Richard J. Willke on the Value of Real-World Data for Health Plans
May 18, 2017
Dr Lou Garrison on the Discussions Surrounding Outcomes-Based Arrangements
May 17, 2017

Dr Clifford Goodman Outlines Takeaways From a Health Economic Case Study on Repatha

During an industry workshop at the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado, Cliff Goodman, PhD, of the Lewin Group, moderated a session that provided a health economic case study on cardiovascular outcome data for Repatha (evolocumab), the PCSK9 inhibitor from Amgen.
During an industry workshop at the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado, Cliff Goodman, PhD, of the Lewin Group, moderated a session that provided a health economic case study on cardiovascular outcome data for Repatha (evolocumab), the PCSK9 inhibitor from Amgen.
 
Study results on Repatha’s ability to cut cardiovascular death, heart attack, or stroke were recently presented at the 66th Scientific Session of the American College of Cardiology.
 
Goodman moderated a discussion between speakers Ransi Somaratne, MD, FACC, of Amgen, and Tanya GK Bentley, PhD, of the Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, and recapped the takeaways of the discussion.
 
What was the key takeaway from the workshop?
The 3 main points of the workshop were basically that, whenever we seek to evaluate the value of a product the modeling inputs matter. The results of these value assessments depend and are driven by the assumptions we make in the inputs to the models. That’s the first point. So when you evaluate the value of a product, you’ve got to pay close attention to the modeling inputs.
 
The second one, because this was a cardiovascular therapy, is that it was clear that the main determining factors of the modeling assessment were the efficacy of the therapy in the indicated population and the cardiovascular event rates that were entered into the model. And by cardiovascular event rates, I mean the rate of cardiovascular events that would be experienced in the target population.
 
And then another point is that, if you ascribe to general accepted thresholds—or I should say, ascribe to increasingly accepted thresholds—of cost-effectiveness based on cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, I was just the moderator but the analyses presented by our expert speakers suggest that this product, evolocumab, would be cost-effective. I would say it might be in the neighborhood of approximately $100,000 to $150,000 per QALY gained. And importantly, that result depends on the use of available data, and the available real-world data, on cardiovascular event rates.
 
So those are the 3 main points: the first one was modeling inputs matter; the second one was, in cardiovascular therapies, efficacy and real-world cardiovascular event rates matter; and the third one is that if we kind of roll these assumptions and data sources and if we ascribe to increasingly accepted cost-effectiveness thresholds (eg, between $100,000 and $150,000 per QALY gained), it would appear that this therapy is cost-effective.
 


 
Copyright AJMC 2006-2017 Clinical Care Targeted Communications Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
x
Welcome the the new and improved AJMC.com, the premier managed market network. Tell us about yourself so that we can serve you better.
Sign Up
×

Sign In

Not a member? Sign up now!