ATS 2013
Dr Richard Channick, MD, Discusses Clinical Trial in Pulmonary Hypertension
Richard Channick, MD, Director, Pulmonary Hypertension and Thromboendarterectomy Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, spoke at the 2013 American Thoracic Society International Conference as part of a session featuring the Clinical Trials in Pulmonary Hypertension. Dr Channick's presentation, “Macitentan Reduces PAH-Related Hospitalizations: Results from the Randomized Controlled SERAPHIN Trial” demonstrated the positive outcomes of the Macitentan drug for pulmonary arterial hypertension in the SERAPHIN trial. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a condition that causes high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs, can be life threatening and often requires hospitalization. When a patient with PAH is hospitalized, it not only negatively impacts a patient's quality of life, but causes a burden on the greater healthcare system. The SERPAHIN trial was unique, in that it was the first ever to consider morbidity and mortality rates in patients with PAH.

Dr Channick said Macitentan is a “novel dual endothelin receptor antagonist with sustained receptor binding," and that SERPAPHIN was the "first event-driven outcomes trial in PAH.” The results showed that Macitentan 3 mg significantly reduced: risk of the combined end point of death due to PAH or hospitalization for PAH by 33%, risk of hospitalization for PAH by 39%, and the rate of all PAH-related hospitalizations by 43%. Further outcome results showed Macitentan 10 mg significantly reduced: risk of the combined end point of death due to PAH and hospitalization by 50%, risk of hospitalization for PAH by 50%, rate of all PAH-related hospitalizations by 55%, and rate of PAH-related hospital days by 52%. The SERAPHIN trial made it clear that in comparison to the placebo drug, Macitentan significantly improved mortality and morbidity rates due to PAH.

Although Macitentan drastically reduced the risk of hospitalization, only Macitentan 10 mg reduced the rate of PAH-related hospital days per year. Dr Channick noted that “This reduction in hospitalizations may favorably impact quality of life and cost of care.” Be reducing hospitalizations caused by PAH, there is a potential to also positively impact future costs of providing care.
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