Currently Viewing:
Contributor
Diabetes and Obesity: Engaging Health-Promoting Behaviors
December 27, 2016
Population-Based Health Policy: Elderly
December 18, 2016
Currently Reading
Population-Based Health Policy: Minorities/Cultural Issues
December 14, 2016
Healthcare Quality: Medical Homes and EMRs
December 06, 2016
Issues and Challenges Associated With Developing Fair, Equitable Health Policy
November 28, 2016

Population-Based Health Policy: Minorities/Cultural Issues

Racial and ethnic differences in access to healthcare are not always due to differences in financial resources and insurance coverage. A majority of minorities receive fewer services when compared with whites who have the same level of health coverage and income.
Minorities, including Native American, Hispanic, Asian, Latinos, and African American populations, are less likely to have a regular source of care. However, racial and ethnic differences in access to healthcare are not always due to differences in financial resources and insurance coverage. A majority of minorities receive fewer services when compared with whites who have the same level of health coverage and income. Cultural differences may exist in patients’ beliefs in regard to the value of medical care and approaches toward seeking treatment for their symptoms.1
 
Communication is a critical aspect in healthcare delivery and must be facilitated by healthcare providers in order to enhance efficiency and performance. Good communication between healthcare providers and patients is imperative for sharing information. However, ineffective communication between patients and healthcare providers of differing races, cultures, and languages results in a reduced chance of rapport building.
 
Disparity/Quality of Care
Health disparity is a type of difference in health that is closely associated with social or economic disadvantage. Health disparity can have adverse effects on people who possess greater social or economic obstacles to health. These barriers originate from characteristics historically associated with discrimination or exclusion, such as ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic status, gender, mental health, sexual orientation, geographic location, cognitive, sensory, and physical disability. It is imperative to have a healthcare system that is based on equity and fairness that provides affordable, accessible, and high-quality care, which gives everyone to have the opportunity to achieve full health potential and no one is disadvantaged due to their social position or any other socially determined circumstances.2
 
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has a significant role in providing a critical foundation for addressing racial and ethnic health disparities. ACA is designed to improve access to healthcare for communities of color. ACA mandates to expand Medicaid, eliminate denials and charging premiums for individuals with pre-existing conditions, increase funding for community health centers, and promote culturally and linguistically appropriate services.3
 
In 2012, almost half of Medicare beneficiaries had annual incomes below $22,500 and the median average among marginalized population was significantly lower than white individuals. While the top 10% of minorities, including black and Hispanic populations, had incomes above $43,900 and $44,550, respectively, the top 10% of white beneficiaries had incomes above $70,000 in 2012. Despite having college degree among black and Hispanic individuals, their incomes were $29,200 and $34,800, respectively, compared with white beneficiaries who had incomes of $41,400. It is indicated that 92% of Medicare beneficiaries had some savings, such as retirements account holdings and other financial assets: 95% among white individuals, 80% among black, and 81% among Hispanic populations. In 2012, 78% of Medicare beneficiaries had some home equity; however, the share was 61% and 60%, respectively, among black and Hispanic beneficiaries. Among individuals who had some home equity in 2012, almost half had less than $93,850 in home equity. The median home equity was $53,650 and $67,700, respectively, among black and Hispanic beneficiaries compared with white population who had $100,200 in home equity in 2012.
 
All of these findings are significant. The analysis acknowledges substantial disparities in income, savings, and home equity among Medicare beneficiaries by race and ethnicity. It is essential to understand the economic realities of the Medicare population, which provides an important context for arranging and assessing Medicare, Social Security, Medicaid, and any other policy proposals that could strengthen or weaken the economic security of older Americans in the marginalized population.4
 


 
Copyright AJMC 2006-2017 Clinical Care Targeted Communications Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
x
Welcome the the new and improved AJMC.com, the premier managed market network. Tell us about yourself so that we can serve you better.
Sign Up
×

Sign In

Not a member? Sign up now!