Patient-Centered Oncology Care 2015

The American Journal of Managed Care hosted its 4th annual Patient-Centered Oncology Care meeting on November 19-20, 2015, in Baltimore, Maryland. The event offered unique perspectives from leading healthcare providers, payers, policy makers, and patients on important issues that impact oncology care, including personalized medicine, immuno-oncology, regulation of laboratory-developed tests, effect of high cost-sharing on patients, and accountable care in oncology.
Advancement in basic science and medical technology has made cancer a curable disease for many patients. Approximately 40% of Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, but as of 2014, 1 in 22 Americans is a cancer survivor, which equals 14.5 million cancer survivors in the US, explained Joseph C. Alvarnas, MD, director of value-based analytics for the City of Hope.
Jack Whelan, an e-patient advocate and patient with a rare blood disease, spoke at The American Journal of Managed Care’s 4th Annual Patient-Centered Oncology Care Meeting. In his presentation, Whelan explained that patient centricity and education is important for all parties in the healthcare industry to better take hold of.
In the United States healthcare system, discussions of value are almost always associated with the equation of quality over cost. However, patients don’t necessarily think that way, explained Yousuf Zafar, MD, MHS, associate professor of medicine and public policy at the Duke Cancer Institute.
While President Barack Obama outlined a series of budget plans for oncology care in the fall of 2015, which was designed to allocate an estimated $130 million to sequence 1 million volunteers, $70 million to identify “genome drivers” and $10 million to the FDA to build databases, Michael A. Kolodziej, MD, FACP, national medical director of Oncology Solutions at Aetna, believes there to be different areas of oncology care that need more attention and resources. Kolodziej presented at The American Journal of Managed Care’s 4th Annual Patient-Centered Oncology Meeting.
There are a number of issues concerning big data in the oncology world, the most prominent of which concerns the number of patients participating in clinical trials, Robert J. Green, MD, MSCE, vice president of clinical strategy at Flatiron Health, explained during his presentation at The American Journal of Managed Care’s 4th Annual Patient-Centered Oncology Meeting. He added that only 4% of adult cancer patients participate in a clinical trial.
Family history is at the core of precision medicine, Joy Larsen Haidle, MS, CGC, 2015 president of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, said during her presentation at The American Journal of Managed Care’s 4th Annual Patient-Centered Oncology Care Meeting. During her presentation, Haidle explained that while hereditary cancer was traditionally viewed as occurring between 5% and 10% of the cancer population, recent data suggest that number may be a lot closer to 25% today.
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