ASTRO's New Guidelines on Post-operative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has issued a new guideline, The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline, that details the use of adjuvant radiation therapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer. The guideline's executive summary is published in the May-June 2014 issue of Practical Radiation Oncology (PRO), the official clinical practice journal of ASTRO. The full-length guideline is available as an open-access article online.
Published Online: April 25, 2014
The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has  issued a new guideline, “The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: An  ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline,” that details the use of adjuvant radiation therapy in the  treatment of endometrial cancer. The guideline’s executive summary is published in the May-June  2014 issue of Practical Radiation Oncology (PRO), the official clinical practice journal of ASTRO.

The  
full-length guideline is available as an open-access article online at www.practicalradonc.org.  ASTRO’s Guidelines Panel of 17 leading gynecologic specialists compiled and reviewed  extensive data from 330 studies from MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialized Register of the  Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group published from 1980 to 2011. The data population  selected for the guideline was defined as women of all races, age 18 or older, with stage I-IV  endometrial cancer of any histologic type or grade. The studies included patients who underwent a  hysterectomy followed by no adjuvant therapy, or pelvic and/or vaginal brachytherapy with or  without systemic chemotherapy. The panel identified five key questions about the role of adjuvant radiation therapy and developed a series of recommendations to address each question. 

Read the press release here: http://bit.ly/QEFuo9

Source: ASTRO


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