BMS Partners with Technology Company CytomX for Antibody Development Platform

BMS, which has a rapidly developing and successful immunooncology pipeline, has entered into a collaboration with CytomX to develop their Probody Therapeutics antibody platform. The Probody technology improves efficacy and safety as the antibodies are activated only in the disease microenvironment and not in normal tissue.
Published Online: May 28, 2014

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and CytomX Therapeutics, Inc . today announced the companies have signed a worldwide research collaboration and license agreement to discover, develop and commercialize novel therapies against multiple immuno-oncology targets using CytomX’s proprietary Probody™ Platform.

Probodies are monoclonal antibodies that are selectively activated within the cancer microenvironment, focusing the activity of therapeutic antibodies to tumors and sparing healthy tissue. The unique selectivity of Probodies expands the therapeutic window for both validated and novel targets, and has the potential to create multiple new classes of safer and more effective therapies.

“Immuno-oncology offers a tremendous opportunity to change how cancer is treated, and Bristol-Myers Squibb is committed to advancing our immuno-oncology drug research and development for patients living with the disease,” said Francis Cuss , MB BChir, FRCP, executive vice president and chief scientific officer, Bristol-Myers Squibb. “The Probody Platform has the potential to broaden discovery of innovative therapies, and the collaboration with CytomX reflects our continued leadership in immuno-oncology.”

Read the complete report here: http://on.mktw.net/1jXyI9E

Source: MarketWatch



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