Castellani: Health Law's Cost-Sharing Could Limit Patient Access To Prescription Drugs

Enrollees in some of the health law's most popular plans will face high cost-sharing requirements that the pharmaceutical industry says could keep patients from getting the drugs they need.
Published Online: May 08, 2014
Enrollees in some of the health law’s most popular plans will face high cost-sharing requirements that the pharmaceutical industry says could keep patients from getting the drugs they need.

Most silver plans in the online marketplaces, or exchanges, require patients to pay for prescription drugs as part of the plan’s deductible, while nearly all bronze plans do, according to a report from Breakaway Health prepared for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the drug industry’s trade group.

Silver plans that combine prescription and medical costs into one deductible — the out-of-pocket costs patients pay before coverage begins –  have average deductibles of $2,275, and similar bronze plans have an average of $4,986, according to the report. The average amount for plans that have separate prescription drug deductibles is $470 for a silver plan and $956 for a bronze one.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1jjNSEP

Source: Kaiser Health News



Feature
Recommended Articles
This week GOP presidential candidate hopefuls turned their attention to the 2016 election as the next best chance to repeal Obamacare, and CMS released data revealing $6.5 billion payments to healthcare providers from drug and medical device makers in 2014.
The deal combines Humana's 3.2 million Medicare enrollees with Aetna's 1.26 million Medicare enrollees, giving the new combined company a strong position as the baby boomer population ages.
In addition to increasing insurance coverage, the Affordable Care Act also aims to improve population health and lower healthcare costs. However, not much attention has been paid to the quality of care the newly insured are receiving.
The UK government has come up with an innovative plan to increase public awareness of the increasing price of prescription drugs and what it costs the healthcare system
New delivery models related to the recent healthcare reform legislation may help drive up utilization, as discussed by Francois de Brantes, MS, MBA; Ateev Mehrotra, MD, MPH; and Arthur Vercillo, MD, FACS, in this seventh segment of the Healthcare Reform Stakeholders Summit, Spring 2015 series. They theorize that healthcare convenience and availability may actually lead to a loss in coordination of care.