Genentech's Avastin Granted Priority Review: Cervical Cancer

Genentech submitted the BLA for bevacizumab for the treatment of recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer.
Published Online: July 15, 2014
Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company's supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) and granted Priority Review for Avastin® (bevacizumab) plus chemotherapy for the treatment of women with persistent, recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer.

“This regulatory application for Avastin is important because chemotherapy is the only approved treatment for women with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer,” said Sandra Horning, M.D., chief medical officer and head of Global Product Development. “Treatment with Avastin plus chemotherapy may help women with these conditions live longer than chemotherapy alone, and we look forward to working with the FDA on potentially making this medicine available to patients.”

Press release: http://on.mktw.net/1nEpO1l

Source: MarketWatch



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